Wandering through the realms of the cosmos, pondering its huge vastness

The South Pacific Total Solar Eclipse

South Pacific eclipse on July 22, 2009 taken from Cook Islands by astrophotographer Alan Dyer (image credit: http://science.nasa.gov)

On Sunday, July 11th, the new Moon will pass directly in front of the sun, producing a spectacular total eclipse over the South Pacific. The path of totality stretches across more than a thousand miles of ocean, making landfall in the Cook Islands, Easter Island, a number of French Polynesian atolls, and the southern tip of South America.

The Moon’s penumbral shadow produces a partial eclipse visible from a much larger region covering the South Pacific and southern South America. Those lucky enough to have made it to the Pacific will witness the last total eclipse to occur until November 2012.

The timings of the eclipse are below.

(P1) Partial begin 17:09:41 UT
(U1) Total begin 18:15:15 UT
Greatest eclipse 19:34:38 UT
(U4) Total end 20:51:42 UT
(P4) Partial end 21:57:16 UT

Additional information regarding the eclipse can be found from this site. See also this map to view the path of the eclipse.

According to Lika Guhathakurta of NASA’s Heliophysics Division in Washington DC, this eclipse will going to be a beautiful sight. She imagines how the event will unfold: First, the Moon’s cool shadow will sweep across the landscape, bringing a breeze of its own to compete with the sea’s. Attentive observers might notice shadow bands (a well-known but mysterious corrugation of the Moon’s outermost shadow) rippling across the beach as the temperature and direction of the wind shift. The ensuing darkness will have an alien quality, not as black as genuine night, but dark enough to convince seabirds to fly to their island roosts. As their cries subside, the sounds of night creatures come to the fore, a noontime symphony of crickets and frogs.

Next comes the moment that obsesses eclipse chasers: The corona pops into view. When the Moon is dead-center in front of the sun, mesmerizing tendrils of gas spread across the sky. It is the sun’s outer atmosphere on full display to the human eye.

Indeed, observing a total solar eclipse is a rare and special experience 😀 Sadly, this event won’t be visible here in the Philippines wherein it will occur at 1pm of July 12th.

But, there’s still a chance to see this eclipse live online 😀

In the following, you find a list of links (courtesy of Thilina Heenatigala) to the website where you can watch the web stream:

Web streams:

LIVE! ECLIPSE 2010
http://www.live-eclipse.org/

LIVE! ECLIPSE 2010 – UStream channel
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/live-eclipse1/v3

Shelios Association/Universidad Politécnica de Madrid’s Ciclope Group
http://eclipsesolar.es/index_en.html

Mision Eclipse (Spanish)
http://broadcast.misioneclipse.es/

Exploratorium
http://www.exploratorium.edu/eclipse/2010/index.html

Shelios 2010
http://www.shelios.com/sh2010/

Eclipse Tahiti (French)
http://www.tahiti-eclipse.com/fr/2010/07/leclipse-de-tahiti-en-direct-live/

Eclipse Tahiti (French) UStream channel.
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/tahiti-eclipse-2010-july-11th

MiC Paris (Japanese)
http://www.eclipse2010.org/

Saros.org (live pictures)
http://live.saros.org/

Enjoy and invite friends to join in!

======

source:

http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov

On Sunday, July 11th, the new Moon will pass directly in front of the sun, producing a total eclipse over the South Pacific. The path of totality stretches across more than a thousand miles of ocean, making landfall in the Cook Islands, Easter Island, a number of French Polynesian atolls, and the southern tip of South America: map

One response

  1. Pingback: Rosetta Spacecraft’s Flyby of Asteroid Lutetia « Journey to the Stars

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