Wandering through the realms of the cosmos, pondering its huge vastness

Posts tagged “philippine sky march 2011

My Image of the Supermoon!

 

Supermoon – March 19, 2011 | Image enhanced in Registax

This image was taken during  UP Astronomical Society‘s free public viewing of the largest full moon at the UP Diliman Sunken Garden.

Thanks to Kuya Anthony Urbano of EtenyWorks for letting us take pictures through his 6″ NERT!

The Moon was ~14% brighter and bigger at the time of this event. Thin clouds blanketed the lunar disk during this night but we were still lucky to catch a glimpse of this celestial beauty.We even saw a 22 degree halo and a colorful lunar corona circling the Moon at the same time.

Saturn was also there within the halo and there were contrails, too left by a passing aircraft.

Thanks to everyone who dropped by. ‘Til next time 🙂 Ad astra per aspera!

“The sky is the ultimate art gallery just above us.” ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

[Some photos were grabbed from Nico Mendoza and Julee Olave 🙂 Used with their permissions]


Lunar Occultation of Omicron Leonis — 17 March 2011

For Philippine observers, a star-moon eclipse will occur on March 17, 2011, from 6:20 pm to 7:10 pm (PHT). The event will be visible to the naked eye, but is best observed with a pair of binoculars, or with an astronomical telescope.

image reposted from eteny.wordpress.com

DETAILS (from AstronomyLive.com)

VISIBILITY: This will be the second time this year that OMICRON LEONIS or Subra will be occulted. This time it’s again visible in south-east Asia and the Phillipines but now also Australia and New Zealand can join the party! The star will disappear on the dark side, meaning easy to spot and very interesting to broadcast.

STAR & MOON: Omicron Leonis is a +3.5 magnitude star. The waxing Moon will be 92%, so there is some lunar disturbance. It all starts in Iba, the Phillipines at 10:50 Universal Time. Check the link below, to see when it starts and ends at your location.

LIVE BROADCASTING SCORE: Good. Although the Moon phase is not optimal, this occultation is beautiful to watch mainly because it disappears behind the dark side of the Moon. Another thing that makes broadcasting this occultation interesting is that the white line on the map – locations where the star will disappear and reappear behind the mountains on the lunar edge during darkness- is near the densely populated cities of south-east Australia. So when living near those white lines you should really find yourself a telescope and watch this occultation taking place.

HOW TO READ THE MAP BELOW?: The white line indicates that the occultation takes place during darkness. Blue is occultation at twilight and the dotted red line indicates occultation during daylight. Cyan means the occultation takes place when the Moon rises or sets. Another important feature of these maps is that you can check grazing locations (on the lines), places where the star will ‘scrape’ the Moon and thereby is occulted for a very short period of time.

LINKS:



Skywatching Highlights: March 2011

March is filled with several exciting conjunctions, lunar occultations, planetary displays and other celestial events which will take place alongside with some big astronomy-related projects geared toward promoting the appreciation of the night sky to many people globally.

March Event Time Notes
5 New Moon 04:45 AM
6 Moon at apogee (farthest distance to Earth) 04:00 PM
7 Final close pairing of Jupiter and the moon for 2011
10 Moon shines near the Pleiades star cluster
11 Moon near star Aldebaran
12 Moon in between Capella and Betelgeuse
12 Juno at Opposition 6:00 PM
13 Moon shines in front of Winter Hexagon
13-18 Close pairing of Mercury and Jupiter dusk These appear low in western horizon
13 First Quarter Moon 07:45 AM
15 Gamma Normids Active from Feb 25 – Mar 22. ZHR 6
16 Minimum separation Mercury Jupiter dusk Mercury 2° to the left of Jupiter
16 Mercury 2° North of the Moon 01:00 AM
17 Lunar occultation of omicron Leonis Start: 6:20 PM End: 07:10 PM
17 Moon and Regulus are less than 10 degrees apart
19 Sun-Earth Day
20 Full Moon 02:10 AM This will also be the largest full moon of the year because it will be near perigee, its closest point to the Earth.
21 Vernal Equinox 07:20 AM
22

6th worldwide GLOBE at Night 2011 campaign

March 22 -April 4 for the Northern Hemisphere

23 Moon near red star Antares before dawn
23 Mercury greatest elongation East(19°) 09:00 AM
26 Last Quarter Moon 08:10 PM
26 Earth Hour 2011 8:30 PM
31 Venus 6° South of the Moon 09:00 PM

Note: Dates and sky displays are based on Philippine settings. Philippine Standard Time (PST) = UT + 8

 

Astronomy Terms:

Occultation – An event that occurs when one object is hidden by another object that passes between it and the observer.

Opposition – When two celestial bodies are on opposite sides of the sky when viewed from a particular place (usually the Earth).

  • it is visible almost all night, rising around sunset, culminating around midnight and setting around sunrise;
  • at this point of its orbit it is roughly[1] closest to the Earth, making it appear bigger and brighter.
  • the half of the planet visible from Earth is then completely illuminated (“full planet”)
  • the opposition effect increases the reflected light from bodies with unobscured rough surfaces
Greatest  (Eastern) Elongation When an inferior planet is visible after sunset, it is near its greatest eastern elongation. A planet’s elongation is the angle between the Sun and the planet, as viewed from Earth
Vernal Equinox The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world. This is also the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the northern hemisphere and the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the southern hemisphere

 

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References:

  1. EarthSky.org
  2. PAGASA Astronomical Diary — March 2011
  3. Philippine Celestial Events for 2011 (by PAS)
  4. SeaSky.org
  5. Wikipedia Encyclopedia